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Group Projects

 

1.      The Development of the Chinese Legal System: Change and Challenges ― by Guanghua YU 

This project, involving 10 colleagues within the Faculty of Law and seven Chinese law scholars locally and internationally, seeks to: i) examine the factors leading to the development of the law in different areas and/or the consequences flowing from the development of the law in different areas; ii) discuss the progress made and/or the obstacles of further developing legal institutions; or iii) explain a phenomenon in the development of the Chinese legal system.

A conference with the same title was held on 10 and 11 of December 2009, which was also the inaugural conference of the CCL. Fourteen papers presented at this Conference were finally selected for publication. The title of this publication is: Guanghua Yu (ed.), The Development of the Chinese Legal System: Change and Challenges (New York: Routledge, 2011).

2.      Legal Reforms in China and Vietnam: A Comparison of Asian Communist Regimes ― by Albert CHEN

Given the fact that China and Vietnam have much in common (such as a Confucian past, socialist influenced legal systems, and rapidly developing economies and societies), studying their similarities and differences is likely to produce valuable insights into the role of ideas and path dependencies play in shaping legal development. Having considered that, the Faculty of Law held a conference entitled ‘Legal Development in East Asia: China-Vietnam Compared’ on 4-5 December 2008. This Conference, with the focus on the differences within the similarities between China and Vietnam, aimed at analysing, comparatively, how different legal ideas and practices arose and shaped the trajectory of legal development. This conference also attempted to produce a nuanced account of how legal reforms in these countries have responded to global and domestic challenges.

Most of the papers presented at this Conference were contained in a subsequent publication jointly edited by Professor Albert Chen of the Faculty of Law and Professor John Gillespie of the Department of Business Law and Taxation, Monash University. The title of this publication is: John Gillespie & Albert H.Y. Chen (eds.), Legal Reforms in China and Vietnam: A comparison of Asian Communist Regimes (New York: Routledge, 2010).

3.    Constitutional Rights & Constitutionalism ― by Hualing FU

To promote the constitutional development of China and help breed a new generation of Chinese constitutional scholars, the Centre organized its first Forum for Young Chinese Constitutional Law Scholars (中国宪法青年学者论坛) on 22-23 January 2010. Seventeen young scholars from mainland China and Hong Kong were invited to participate in the conference to discuss various issues relating to the development of Chinese constitutional law and constitutional rights.

Sixteen papers presented at this Conference were selected and contained in a publication jointly edited by Professor Hualing Fu of the Faculty of Law and Dr. Guobin Zhu of the School of Law of City University of Hong Kong. This Chinese book, entitled宪法权利与宪政¾¾当代中国宪法问题研究 (Constitutional Rights & ConstitutionalismStudies of Constitutional Problems in Contemporary China), has been published by The University of Hong Kong Press in 2012.

With the success of the first Forum for Young Chinese Constitutional Law Scholars in 2010, the Centre intended to make the Forum an annual event to provide a platform for new generation of Chinese constitutional scholars to exchange scholarship on Chinese constitutional law and discuss issues of common concern. The second Forum, with the theme of ‘Government Regulation and Citizens’ Rights’, was held on 21-22 January 2011. Preparation for the third Forum in 2013 is underway.

4.      Rethinking Law and Development: The Chinese Experience – by Guanghua YU

This project examines the role of law in China’s economic development, law and politics/human rights, and international elements in and international implications of China’s development. The project involves Academic Members and Academic Advisors of the Centre and reputable scholars on Asian and Chinese Law. A conference entitled “From Economic Development to Human Flourishing: The Case of China” was held in December 2011 to disseminate the results of research, to exchange ideas and to further improve the papers. The results of the revised papers have now been incorporated into a book entitled “Rethinking Law and Development: The Chinese Experience”. This book will be published by Routledge in 2013.